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Removing Oil Stains

COIT’S GUIDE TO OIL STAIN REMOVAL

Whether you encounter an oil stain on your garage floor, on your favorite shirt or on the carpet, it can put a damper on your day if you don’t know how to remove it. Luckily, oil stain removal is something you can do on your own by following a few specific steps.

With COIT’s step-by-step guide to oil stain removal, a few unexpected oil stains won’t stand a chance.

THE 411 ON OIL STAINS

Depending on the type of oil stain you’re trying to remove, you’ll be working with oil that’s made of different ingredients. Cooking oil, for example, is most likely a blend of oils from different sources. It’s either plant, animal or synthetic fat that can be used to bake, fry and cook in other ways. Edible oil doesn’t need heat to be used in food items like bread dips and salad dressings.

TYPES OF COOKING OIL

The following oils are commonly used in cooking, and can often leave unexpected stains on surrounding areas:

  • Canola oil
  • Mustard oil
  • Soybean oil
  • Rice bran oil
  • Palm oil 

When cooking with oil, it’s important to remember that bubbling oil – oil that has reached its boiling point – is dangerous. Burning oil often splatters and can then come into contact with skin or other surfaces, causing injury or stains. Be sure you’re aware of how quickly the oil is gathering heat to avoid this whenever possible.

TYPES OF MOTOR OIL

If you don’t cook regularly, but you own a car, you can easily track motor oil stains into your home. Typically motor oil can leak onto concrete surfaces in garages and then latch onto the bottoms of your shoes. If this happens, it’s helpful to know how to remove oil stains from concrete to prevent this from happening.